In Business, News

Image: Bali’s first modern landfill project in Bangli. Credit: naue.asia

Badung generates 281 tons of rubbish a day, which is now causing a headache for the local government, especially since the Suwung landfill site recently stated limiting the trash capacity. This condition has thrown the Badung Regional Representatives (DPRD) into a planning frenzy to find a solution.

The Head of Third Commission of Badung DPRD, Putu Alit Yandinata, said that this issue is Badung’s responsibility and they must construct an independent landfill to solve the problem.

“We will provide an unlimited budget to solve this problem for the island. Badung will be ready to accommodate all Bali rubbish by 2023,” Alit Yandinata said to radarbali.com.

He also said that the plan was discussed in the 2020 Regional Budget (APBD), and the waste management plan will be the priority. Alit opined that Badung should have a state of art landfill, because the district is a tourism destination where most of the income comes from the tourism industry.

“We will start to prepare the budget now. We cannot stop other projects and expenditure just like that. It would be like a speeding car that is forced to stop, and it’s not right. We must prepare it from the beginning. If we prepare the budget now, we can move in 2020,” he added.

He also said that he wanted the related Regional Works Unit to prepare everything, starting from the consulting, finding the location and technology.

“This plan is a priority and we will fully back it up,” Alit explained.

With optimal waste management, Alit was sure that Badung will be ready to handle the trash issue, and even accommodate all Bali garbage by 2023. “If the waste management and the technology system for the landfill is good we will be able to receive more trash. The technology is the expensive part, though,” Alit said.

With state of the art technology, Alit continued, they won’t need a big space. “We don’t need hectares of land. Like in other counties, they don’t need a big space, but the technology is expensive,” he said. He also asked the community to support the government plan, because it’s everyone’s common goal.

“We hope the local people will not strike and deny this. The government’s good intentions must be appreciated and that’s why we ask Badung residents to give their feedback for the location and participate in the process, too,” Alit concluded.

Meanwhile, another temporary rubbish dump site has been cleared in the north Canggu area in the Seseh intersection area. The ​​27 are site is located in Banjar Dukuh and according to Dalung Village Head, Putu Gede Arif Wiratya there was no problem with the construction of the 3R rubbish dump. “We have talked to all three traditional villages in the area and there is no problem for the construction of the 3R dump,” he said. That area has been in use since last Thursday.

 

Showing 9 comments
  • Michael
    Reply

    And you really thinks that will solve the problem?! Millions of akkus and batteries and spray doses…

  • Bule
    Reply

    To many tourist , generate rubbish .. Bring departure tax to pay for for resources to solve the rubbish issue

    • tormentsister
      Reply

      maybe you should just use the money that all the tourists bring into the country, use it for infrastructure programs and not let it sink into a few bags! Or spend it for meaningless plans of a 2 airport
      and the tourists cause so much garbage? Strange when I’m on the beach or traveling are the only ones who throw away their garbage just the locals! Be it in sewers, rivers, beaches and their oh so high cultural temples and cemeteries. experienced this weekend again, 3 days ceremony and it looks like on the garbage dump and on the other hand they expect from the tourists you should respect the culture more ?!
      more like a culture of trash and ignorance and more money from the tourists but nothing in exchange

  • fred tingle
    Reply

    Re Bule post, The tourist already pay a departure tax. It is getting to the stage where many tourists are now bypassing Bali because of all the taxes and surcharges imposed on them.

  • Dedublya
    Reply

    In my village, the small girl child observes the mother throwing spent packets in the small drains, the father litters the same drain with cigarette butts. So what do you think the child does? Hmm, copies what its taught. A fantastic Balinese family, but if i mention a Bin use kindly, i get this wonderful nice big smile. Tidak malu! Just utter Bewilderment.! Why?
    Tourist bashing and pointed fees on this universal problem is not the answer. The population is the problem.

  • David Stevenson
    Reply

    Should have been done years ago..put me off my beloved Bali..and so many others..

  • Brendda Puspa
    Reply

    Start educating the Balinese children while still in school. Bali will need Millennial Eco Teachers in these schools. Please just do it.

  • Mickey Claas
    Reply

    Comparing this project with other technology nations and the rest of Indonesia is an amazing step forward and a step in the right direction. The abolition of plastic bags in supermarkets is exemplary. Bravo! However, the money to finance waste management programs and technologies should come from companies that sell the products, especially plastics, in order to make products in plastic packaging as unattractive as possible to the consumer. Nestle, Coca Cola and Co. must finally take responsibility. If not voluntary, then just by state-imposed levies. Of course, the whole thing can only work sustainably if you initiate education systems at the same time and focus on waste prevention instead of disposal.

  • Ellen Foster-Taylor
    Reply

    This plan can’t be serious …..Bali really needs serious education.

Make a comment