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Image: Golose and Unud staff check distilling equipment at Udayana University. Credit: Bali Polda. 

The Bali Regional Police have recently employed their water cannon trucks to spray disinfectant liquids around town to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, but Bali Police Chief Inspector General Pol. Dr. Peter Reinhard Golose hasn’t stopped there.

He approached the chancellor, deans and pharmacy experts of Udayana University to make safe disinfectants and hand sanitizers from Balinese arak according to WHO (World Health Organization) standards, which states should have a minimum 96% alcohol content.

This was stated by Head of Regional Police Golose at a discussion at the Udayana University Rectorate Building, Jimbaran on Monday (30/3). The meeting was attended by the Rector of Udayana University, Prof. Dr. dr. AA Raka Sudewi, Sp.S (K), other related officials and the media.

Inspector General Golose explained that disinfectant fluids and hand sanitizers are currently so scarce that they are difficult to find. A few disinfectant liquids are being made by the community themselves using makeshift ingredients with varying success, with some claimed to be ineffective.

“This occurs due to lack of knowledge and the main chemical ingredient, alcohol, being already very rare and expensive if found,” he stressed.

Therefore, the chief of police together with the university will make disinfectant liquid and hand sanitizer. The police gave 3,000 liters of Balinese arak to be extracted into 96 percent pure alcohol according to the WHO standard.

The process of extracting the pure alcohol will be done using equipment in the laboratory of the Faculty of Pharmacy at Udayana University.

This collaboration is expected to assist the government in overcoming the scarcity of disinfectants and hand sanitizers in the Bali region, particularly in the area of ​​community service.

“The Bali Regional Police together with elements of the Bali COVID-19 Task Force will carry out sterilization or disinfection in places of community activities. This process is being held simultaneously throughout Indonesia,” concluded Golose.

Showing 2 comments
  • ronald carter
    Reply

    Spraying the roads of Bali is a waste of time and money unless you spray every road everyday. Within 12 hours the disinfectant would lose it’s effectiveness. It would far better to concentrate on sanitizing shop’s door handles tables chairs counters. Any place where people gather indoor eg Temples Mosques. Thank you Ron

  • Benoit RÉPESSÉ.
    Reply

    Innovation at its best. Pure logical and straight forward thinking. Brilliant.

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